*All discounts are subject to eligibility criteria and applicable rates and rules at the time of purchase. Actual savings vary. Life multi-policy discount is not available in conjunction with auto policies already taking advantage of ERIE Rate Lock®. Erie Family Life insurance products are not available in New York. For additional information, contact your local ERIE agent. 

Shopping for car insurance? You've come to the right place! State Farm keeps you and your family covered with great auto insurance that's also a great value. Get an online auto insurance quote, or find a car insurance agent or representative, any time, day or night. Either way, you'll learn how competitively priced auto insurance from the industry leader can be.
The National Association of Insurance Commissioners (NAIC) is the U.S. standard-setting and regulatory support organization created and governed by the chief insurance regulators from the 50 states, the District of Columbia and five U.S. territories. Through the NAIC, state insurance regulators establish standards and best practices, conduct peer review, and coordinate their regulatory oversight. NAIC staff supports these efforts and represents the collective views of state regulators domestically and internationally. NAIC members, together with the central resources of the NAIC, form the national system of state-based insurance regulation in the U.S. For more information, visit www.naic.org.

A nearby Allstate agent can help with all of the details. Select your state below to find insurance agents near you. Your local Allstate agent works and lives in your area and knows the ins and outs of your community. Call for a quote, to ask questions or to compare the policy you currently have with what Allstate has to offer. We’re here to help you protect what’s important to you.

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As we kick off the new year, I think a great habit to develop is to be aware of our energy. Ralph Waldo Emerson said “The world belongs to the energetic.” We all have been there I think, or at least I have, where we are down in the dumps, moping around, and just getting through the day. I call that default mode. Become aware of that, choose your energy, fake it if you have too, shoulders up high, smile, say hello, give compliments to your co-workers, increase your action, get focused on your goals and level up!
An agent or broker is a person or business who can help you apply for help paying for coverage and enroll in a Qualified Health Plan (QHP) through the Marketplace. They can make specific recommendations about which plan you should enroll in. They’re also licensed and regulated by states and typically get payments, or commissions, from health insurers for enrolling a consumer into an issuer's plans. Some brokers may only be able to sell plans from specific health insurers.
A nearby Allstate agent can help with all of the details. Select your state below to find insurance agents near you. Your local Allstate agent works and lives in your area and knows the ins and outs of your community. Call for a quote, to ask questions or to compare the policy you currently have with what Allstate has to offer. We’re here to help you protect what’s important to you.
You can probably buy life insurance without speaking to another human being, but you should probably ask a professional for help. Even just researching the correct information can be a challenge, as different resources can have differing content and lead you astray. This can become especially frustrating as the laws change at both federal and state levels, and it’s an agent’s job to help you navigate all the nuances of buying insurance.
These reviews are all from Medicare beneficiaries just like you. Our clients consistently rate us 5 stars for both our up-front help, but also the phenomenal back-end support you get from our Client Service Team. We have some of the very best Medicare supplement agents in the country. These independent Medicare advisors truly care. You can read our reviews here. Notice how many of them are from clients who called us when Medicare denied their claim or rejected their bills or their doctor mis-codes a service or when they are standing at the pharmacy and can’t get their medication. Normally you would call the insurance company yourself to try to figure out how to fix these things.
In the United States, insurance brokers are regulated by the individual U.S. states. Most states require anyone who sells, solicits, or negotiates insurance in that state to obtain an insurance broker license, with certain limited exceptions. This includes a business entity, the business entity's officers or directors (the "sublicensees" through whom the business entity operates), and individual employees. In order to obtain a broker's license, a person typically must take pre-licensing courses and pass an examination. An insurance broker also must submit an application (with an application fee) to the state insurance regulator in the state in which the applicant wishes to do business, who will determine whether the insurance broker has met all the state requirements and will typically do a background check to determine whether the applicant is considered trustworthy and competent. A criminal conviction, for example, may result in a state determining that the applicant is untrustworthy or incompetent. Some states also require applicants to submit fingerprints.
Of course, there is nothing stopping consumers from utilizing all of these resources — other than the time it takes to conduct research and compare policies. Regardless of which route you take, it is always worthwhile to check with organizations such as AAA or the Better Business Bureau, as well as your personal network for referrals, recommendations and reviews, to find the insurance professional that is right for you.
To all of those saying "I'd rather do it on my own," you're definitely taking a huge chance, and more than likely are throwing a ton of money away. There are certain fields where you can do things on your own. However, insurance isn't one of those fields that would be advisable to take that course of action. The laws/rules are sky high, and many of these laws and rules change every single year. Trust me, even if you don't think you're throwing money away, you more than likely are. Whether you choose a broker or captive agent captive agent, I would recommend using a professional who has in depth knowledge. I mean, it's free, anyway. Insurance is similar to the legal/lawyer field. If I had a case, I certainly wouldn't want to represent myself.
Competition exists between exclusive agents and independent agents. Exclusive agents, who are salaried employees of the insurance company, write a majority of the personal lines business.[8] However, because of the complexities involved in commercial risks, independent agents capture approximately 80 percent of the commercial lines market.[9] It is having access to multiple markets that gives independent agents a competitive advantage in commercial lines. 

But the commissions are already built into the premium. Insurance prices are regulated by the states; each life insurance company’s policies should start at a baseline value that will be essentially the same cost to you across the board (except for the various factors that insurers use to calculate your rate, such as age and health). Each insurance company develops rate tables and then files those rate tables with the state’s insurance department. Because these rates are set beforehand, an agent can’t offer you one company’s policy at a different rate than you’d get by simply going to the company itself.
Most of the time, agents are independent contractors, and they can be either captive agents or noncaptive agents (also known as independent agents). The former means that they work directly for a single insurance company, and the latter means they work for multiple insurance companies. Brokers, like Policygenius, are more independent, and work with a large number of insurance companies. They may also sell more insurance products, like disability insurance. Captive agents have fewer options to offer you because they only have their parent company’s policies to choose from.
There are a number of major trade organizations that support the interests and needs of the independent insurance agent, including Agents For Change,[3] The National Organization of Life and Health Agents (NOLHA),[4] the Independent Insurance Agents & Brokers of America (The Big "I"),[5] and the National Association of Professional Insurance Agents (PIA).[6]

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